5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945

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, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseThe 5th Division was activated on December 11 1917 at Camp Logan, near Houston, Texas. Sent oversea, as a member of the American Expeditionary Force, to participate in the late part of World War One, the entire division arrived in France on May 1 1917 and components of the units were deployed into the front line.

In this period, the composition of the 5th Division was as follow : 9th Infantry Brigade, 60th Infantry Regiment, 61st Infantry Regiment, 14th Machine Gun Battalion, 10th Infantry Brigade, 6th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Regiment, 15th Machine Gun Battalion, 5th Field Artillery Brigade, 19th Field Artillery Regiment, 20th Field Artillery Regiment, 21st Field Artillery Regiment, Division Troops, 13th Machine Gun Battalion, 7th Engineer Regiment, 9th Field Signal Battalion, Headquarters Troop, Trains, 5th Train Headquarters and Military Police, 5th Ammunition Train, 5th Supply Train, 7th Engineer Train, 5th Sanitary Train (Ambulance Companies and Field Hospitals 17, 25, 29, 30).

The 5th Division trained with the French Army units from June 1 to June 14 1917. On September 12, the unit was part of a major attack that reduced the salient at Saint Mihiel. The division served in the Army of Occupation, being based in Belgium and in Luxembourg in Esch-sur-Alzette, until it departed Europe. The division returned to the United States (NY POE – Hoboken) New Jersey on July 21 1919 and was stationed at Camp Gordon, Georgia until October 1920.


, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseThe 5th Division moved then to Camp Jackson, South Carolina and was inactivated on October 4 1921, except for the 10th Infantry Brigade and its supporting elements.

The 5th Division was provisionally activated in August 1936 at Fort Knox, Kentucky for the Second Army’s Maneuvers using the 10th Infantry Brigade and the West Virginia Army National Guard’s 201st Infantry Regiment. In October 1939, the 5th Division was reactivated as part of the United States mobilization in response to the outbreak of World War II in Europe in September 1939, being formed at Fort McClellan, Alabama under the command of Brig Gen Campbell Hodges.

The following spring, in 1940, the division was sent to Fort Benning, Georgia, and then temporarily to Louisiana for training exercises, before being transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana at the end of May 1940. That December the division relocated to Fort Custer, Michigan, from where it participated in the Tennessee maneuvers. The division went next to Camp Joseph T. Robinson, Arkansas, in August 1941 for staging into both the Arkansas and Louisiana Maneuvers before returning to Fort Custer that October.

The division, under the command of Maj Gen Cortlandt Parker from August, was stationed there when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and Germany declared war on the United States in December 1941, thus bringing the United States into the conflict. As the winter passed the division was brought up to strength and fully equipped for forward deployment into a war zone.

During April 1942, the Division received its overseas orders and departed the New York Port POE at the end of the month for Iceland. The 5-ID debarked there in May 1942, where it replaced the British garrison on the island outpost along the Atlantic convoy routes, and a year later was reorganized and re-designated as the 5th Infantry Division on 24 May 1943.

Commanding General
Maj Gen S. Leroy Irwin Dec 15 1943 – Apr 20 1945
Maj Gen Albert E. Brown – Apr 20 1945 – deactivation

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseAssistant Division Commander
Brig Gen Alan D. Warnock 15 Dec 1943 – deactivation

Artillery Division Commander
Brig Gen Harnold C. Vanderveer – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Chief of Staff
Col Paul O. Franson – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Assistant Chief of Staff – G-1
Lt Col Hugh J. Socks – Dec 15 1943 – Feb 6 1944
Maj Clayton E. Crafts – Feb 6 1944 – Jul 1 1944
Lt Col Clayton E. Crafts – Jul 1 1944 – deactivation

Assistant Chief of Staff – G-2
Lt Col Donald W. Thackery – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Assistant Chief of Staff – G-3
Lt Col Randolph C. Dickens – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Assistant Chief of Staff – G-4
Lt Col Richard L. McKee – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Assistant Chief of Staff – G-5
Maj George E. B. Peddy – May 13 1944 – Nov 1 1944
Lt Col George E. B. Peddy – Nov 1 1944 – deactivation

Adjutant General
Maj Charles H. Conway – Dec 15 1943 – Feb 1 1944
Lt Col Charles H. Conway – Feb 1 1944 – deactivation

Commanding 2nd Infantry Regiment
Col A. Worrell Roffe – Jul 10 1944 – Apr 26 1945
Col Walter R. Graham – Apr 26 1945 – deactivation

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseCommanding 10th Infantry Regiment
Col Robert P. Bell – Dec 15 1943 – deactivation

Commanding 11th Infantry Regiment
Col Charles W. Yuill – Jul 9 1944 – Nov 21 1944
Col Paul J. Black – Nov 21 1944 – deactivation

Chronology
Activated – Oct 2 1939
10-IR Arrived in Iceland – Sep 16 1941
46-FAB Arrived in Iceland – Sep 16 1941
HQs Arrived in Iceland – May 10 1942
Arrived UK – Aug 3 1943
Arrived France – (D 33) Jul 9 1944
Entered Combat (First Elements) – Jul 14 1944
Entered Combat (Entire Division) – Jul 16 1944
Days in Combat – 270

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseCasualties
Killed in Action – 2083
Wounded in Action – 9278
Missing in Action – 1073
Captured – 101
Battle Casualties – 12475
Non-Battle Casualties – 11012
Total Casualties – 23487
Percent of T/O Strength 166.7

Campaigns
Normandy
Northern France
Ardennes
Rhineland
Central Europe , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
Awards
Distinguished Service Cross – 34
Legion of Merit – 16
Silver Star – 608
Soldiers Medal – 12
Bronze Star – 2207
Air Medal – 98
Distinguished Flying Cross – 2
POWs Taken – 71603

Order of Battle (Organic)
Hq & Hq Company 5th Infantry Division
2nd Infantry Regiment
10th Infantry Regiment
11th Infantry Regiment
5th Reconnaissance Troop (Mecz)
7th Engineer Combat Battalion
5th Medical Battalion
Hq & Hq Battery 5th Division Artillery
19th Field Artillery Battalion (105-MM Howitzer)
46th Field Artillery Battalion (105-MM Howitzer)
50th Field Artillery Battalion (105-MM Howitzer)
21st Field Artillery Battalion (155-Howitzer)
Special Troops
705th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
5th Quartermaster Company , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
5th Signal Company
Military Police Platoon
Band

Attachment to the 5th Infantry Division
Antiaircraft Artillery
449th AAA AW Bn (Mbl) – 13 Jul 44 – 23 Nov 44
D Btry, 116th AAA Gun Bn (Mbl) – 30 Jul 44 – 1 Aug 44
449th AAA AW Bn (Mbl) – 29 Nov 44 – 31 Mar 45

Armored
735th Tank Bn – 13 Jul 44 – 20 Oct 44
CCB, 7-AD – 9 Sep 44 – 15 Sep 44
735th Tank Bn – 1 Nov 44 – 20 Dec 44
737th Tank Bn – 23 Dec 44 – 11 Jun 45
748th Tank Bn – 22 Mar 45 – 23 Mar 45
B Co, 17th Tank Bn (7-AD) – 8 Apr 45 – 10 Apr 45

Cavalry
38th Cav Rcn Sq (-Troop B) – 14 Jul 44 – 18 Jul 44
Troop B, 38th Cav Rcn Sq – 14 Jul 44 – 30 Jul 44
Troop C, 3rd Cav Rcn Sq – 7 Sep 44 – 11 Sep 44
3rd Cav Rcn Sq, 11 Sep 44 – 14 Sep 44
6th Cav Gp – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44
6th Cav Rcn Sq – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44
Troop E, 28th Cav Rcn Sq – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44
Troop C, 2d Cav Rcn Sq – 26 Mar 45 – 28 Mar 45
32nd Cav Rcn Sq – 8 Apr 45 – 13 Apr 45
Troop F, 18th Cav Rcn Sq – 8 Apr 45 – 13 Apr 45
, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
Chemical
D Co, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 13 Jul 44 – 1 Aug 44
84th Cml SG Co – 7 Sep 44 – 20 Sep 44
Cos C&D, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 19 Sep 44 – 20 Oct 44
C Co, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 1 Nov 44 – 10 Nov 44
D Co, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 1 Nov 44 – 22 Nov 44
A Co, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 16 Dec 44 – 21 Dec 44
C Co, 91st Cml Mort Bn – 22 Dec 44 – 15 Jan 45
D Co, 91st Cml Mort Bn – 22 Dec 44 – 1 Feb 45
C Co, 91st Cml Mort Bn – 4 Feb 45 – 22 Feb 45
2 secs, 81st Cml Mort Bn – 6 Feb 45 – 12 Feb 45
84th Cml SG Co – 12 Feb 45 – 28 Feb 45
84th Cml SG Co – 2 Mar 45 – 5 Mar 45
2 secs, 84th Cml SG Co – 13 Mar 45 – 24 Mar 45
84th Cml SG Co (-2 secs) – 21 Mar 45 – 24 Mar 45
B Co, 90th Cml Mort Bn – 8 Apr 45 – 15 Apr 45
C Co, 90th Cml Mort Bn – 12 Apr 45 – 15 Apr 45

Engineer
150th Engr Cbt Bn – 9 Aug 44 – 13 Aug 44
1 plat, 994th Engr Treadway Br Co – 9 Aug 44 – 13 Aug 44
537th Engr Light Pon Co – 9 Aug 44 – 13 Aug 44
1 plat, 537th Engr Light Pon Co – 24 Aug 44 – 27 Aug 44
160th Engr Cbt Bn – 25 Aug 44 – 27 Aug 44
989th Engr Treadway Br Co – 25 Aug 44 – 27 Aug 44
160th Engr Cbt Bn – 29 Aug 44 – 30 Aug 44
989th Engr Treadway Br – 29 Aug 44 – 30 Aug 44 , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
509th Engr Light Pon Co – 29 Aug 44 – 30 Aug 44
B Co, 293d Engr C Bn – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44

Field Artillery
187th FAB (155-MM How) – 30 Jul 44 – 1 Aug 44
204th FAB (155-MM How) – 9 Aug 44 – 13 Aug 44
B Btry, 7th FAOB – 10 Aug 44 – 13 Aug 44
282d FAB (105-MM How) – 25 Aug 44 – 5 Sep 44
241st FAB (105-MM How) – 25 Aug 44 – 29 Sep 44
284th FAB (105-MM How) – 25 Aug 44 – 21 Oct 44
434th FAB – 10 Sep 44 – 15 Sep 44
284th FAB (105-MM How) – 8 Nov 44 – 22 Nov 44
244th FAB (155-MM Gun) – 22 Nov 44 – 7 Dec 44
1 sec, B Btry, 558th FAB (155-MM Gun) – 28 Nov 44 – 7 Dec 44
284th FAB (105-MM How) – 16 Dec 44 – 21 Dec 44
B Btry, 558th FAB (155-MM Gun) – 16 Dec 44 – 21 Dec 44
1 plat, C Btry, 558th FAB (155-MM Gun) – 11 Feb 45 – 21 Feb 45

Infantry
5th Ranger Bn – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44
Task Force Riley (10-AD) – 22 Dec 44 – 23 Dec 44
3rd Bn, 8-IF (4-ID) – 15 Jan 45 – 17 Jan 45
417th RCT (76-ID) – 4 Feb 45 – 11 Feb 45
2d Bn, 101-IR (26-ID) – 23 Mar 45 – 21 Mar 45
357-IR (90-ID) – 23 Mar 45 – 24 Mar 45
Task Force Satt – 2 Apr 45 – 4 Apr 45
16 Belgian Fusilliers – 18 Apr 45 – 19 Apr 45

Tank Destroyer
818-TDB (SP) – 13 Jul 44 – 20 Dec 44
774-TDB (T) – 14 Sep 44 – 24 Sept 44
B Co, 774-TDB (T) – 26 Sep 44 – 15 Oct 44
A Co, 774-TDB (T) – 26 Sep 44 – 22 Oct 44
705-TDB (SP) – 1 Nov 44 – 2 Nov 44
773-TDB (SP) – 1 Nov 44 – 2 Nov 44
774-TDB (T) – 5 Nov 44 – 22 Nov 44
C Co, 602-TDB (SP) – 1 Dec 44 – 16 Dec 44
807-TDB (SP) – 17 Dec 44 – 21 Dec 44
C Co, 808-TDB (SP) – 21 Dec 44 – 23 Dec 44
654-TDB (SP) – 22 Dec 44 – 25 Dec 44
C Co, 808-TDB (SP) – 23 Dec 44 – 28 Dec 44
803-TDB (SP) – 25 Dec 44 – 13 Jun 45 , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
1 plat, B Co, 808-TDB (SP) – 10 Feb 45 – 16 Feb 45
B Co, 691-TDB (T) – 23 Mar 45 – 24 Mar 45

5th Infantry Division – Attachments to
Cavalry
5th Recon Troop to 4-ID – 23 Dec 44 – 24 Dec 44

Field Artillery
5th Div Arty to 95-ID – 23 Nov 44 – 27 Nov 44

Infantry
2-RCT to 2-AD – 10 Sep 44 – 15 Sep 44
3/10-IR to 95-ID – 26 Nov 44 – 28 Nov 44
10-RCT to 95-ID – 30 Nov 44 – 1 Dec 44
3/2-IR to 95-ID – 12 Dec 44 – 17 Dec 44
10-RCT to 4-ID – 22 Dec 44 – 24 Dec 44
46-FAB to 4-ID – 22 Dec 44 – 24 Dec 44
B/7-ECB to 4-ID – 22 Dec 44 – 24 Dec 44
11-RCT to 4-AD – 8 Mar 45 – 1 Mar 45
1/11-IR to 7-AD – 15 Apr 45 – 7 Apr 45

Assignment & Attachment to Higher Units
11 May 42 – V Corps, Assigned to Iceland Base Command
22 Oct 43 – Attached to 1A and Assigned to ETOUSA , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
24 Dec 43 – XV Corps, Attached to 1A
31 Jan 44 – XV Corps, Attached to ETOUSA
13 Jul 44 – V Corps, Assigned to 1A, Assigned to ETOUSA
1 Aug 44 – Assigned 3A, Attached 1A, Assigned 12-AD
4 Aug 44 – XX Corps, Assigned to 3A, Assigned to 12-AG
21 Dec 44 – XII Corps, Assigned to 3A, Assigned to 12-AD
28 Mar 45 – XX Corps, Assigned to 3A, Assigned to 12-AG
7 Apr 45 – III Corps, Assigned to 3A, Assigned to 12-AG
18 Apr 45 – Assigned 3A, Attached to 1A, Assigned to 12-AG
22 Apr 45 – XVI Corps (Opns), Assigned to 3A, Attached 9A, Assigned 12-AG
25 Apr 45 – III Corps, Assigned 3A, Attached 1A, Assigned 12-AG
29 Apr 45 – XII Corps, Assigned 3A, Attached 1A, Assigned 12-AG

Narrative

The 5th Infantry Division, now commanded by Maj Gen Stafford LeRoy Irwin, left Iceland in early August 1943 and was sent to England to prepare and train for the eventual invasion of Northwestern part of Europe, then scheduled for the spring of 1944. After two years of training the Red Diamond Division landed in Normandy on Utah Beach on July 9 1944, and four days later took up defensive positions in the vicinity of Caumont.

Launching a successful attack at Vidouville on July 26, the division drove on southeast of St-Lô, attacked and captured Angers on August 9-10.

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseAssisted by the 7-AD, thre 5-ID captured Chartres on August 18, pushed to Fontainebleau, crossed the Seine at Montereau on August 24, crossed then the Marne River and seized Reims on August 30.

Halted for a regroup and a refitting in the area east of Verdun, the 5-ID prepared for the assault on Metz for September 7. In mid-September, after numerous casualties and two attempts, a bridgehead was finally secured across the Moselle River, south of Metz, at Dornot and Arnaville. The first attempt (11-IR in Dornot) failed. The German-held Fort Driant played a role in repulsing this crossing. A second crossing by the 10-IR at Arnaville was successful. The division continued the operations against Metz from September 16 to October 16, withdrew, then returned to the assault on November 9.

Metz finally fell on November 22. The division crossed the German border on December 4, captured Lauterbach (vicinity of Völklingen) on December 5, and elements reached the west bank of the Saar River on December 6 before the division moved to assembly areas.

On December 16 1944, the Germans launched their winter offensive in the Ardennes forest, the Battle of the Bulge, and on December 18, the 5-ID was thrown in against the southern flank of the Bulge, helping to reduce it by the end of January 1945. In February and March, the division drove across and northeast of the Sauer River, where it smashed through the Siegfried Line and later took part in the Allied invasion of Germany.

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseThe Red Diamond’s Soldiers crossed the Rhine River during the night of March 22 1945. After capturing some 19.000 German soldiers, the division continued to Frankfurt-am-Main, clearing and policing the town and its environs, March 27–29. In April the 5th Infantry Division, now commanded by Maj Gen Albert E. Brown, Maj Gen Irwin being promoted to take over the XII Corps, took part in clearing the Ruhr Pocket and then drove across the Czechoslovak border on May 1 reaching Volary and Vimperk as the war in Europe ended.

5th Infantry Division – Red Diamond – Command Posts

26 Jan 1944 – Tidworth Barracks – Wiltshire – England
15 Feb 1944 – Bryansford – North Ireland
10 Jul 1944 – Montebourg – Manche – France
15 Jul 1944 – Balleroy – Calvados – France
24 Jul 1944 – Corisy-la-Foret – Manche – France
29 Jul 1944 – Litteau – Manche – France
1 Aug 1944 – Aux Malles – Calvados – France
4 Aug 1944 – Cerisy-la-Salle – Manche – France
5 Aug 1944 – Lafrense Vitry – Manche – France
11 Aug 1944 – Angers – Maine-et-Loire – France
13 Aug 1944 – St Calais – Sarthe – France
14 Aug 1944 – Authon – Eure-et-Loire – France
15 Aug 1944 – Harville – Eure-et-Loire – France
17 Aug 1944 – Pezy – Eure-et-Loire – France
18 Aug 1944 – Levesville – Eure-et-Loire – France
22 Aug 1944 – Thionville – Seine-et-Marne – France
23 Aug 1944 – Malesherbes – Seine-et-Marne – France
23 Aug 1944 – Nemours – Seine-et-Marne – France
24 Aug 1944 – Villecerf – Seine-et-Marne – France
26 Aug 1944 – Goumery – Seine-et-Marne – France
27 Aug 1944 – Suzanne – Marne – France , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
29 Aug 1944 – Charmoye – Marne – France
29 Aug 1944 – Sermier – Marne – France
30 Aug 1944 – Reims – Marne – France
31 Aug 1944 – Somme-Suippe – Marne – France
1 Sep 1944 – Verdun – Meuse – France
6 Sep 1944 – Vionville – Meuse – France
13 Sep 1944 – Chambley – Meurthe-et-Moselle – France
27 Sep 1944 – Villers-sur-le-Preny – Meurthe-et-Moselle – France
20 Oct 1944 – Piennes – Meurthe-et-Moselle – France
1 Nov 1944 – Villers-sur-le-Preny – Meurthe-et-Moselle – France
11 Nov 1944 – Lesmenils – Meurthe-et-Moselle – France
16 Nov 1944 – Ft Leisne (vic Verny) – Moselle – France
2 Dec 1944 – Zimming (adv) – Moselle – France
6 Dec 1944 – Mine de Huille (Creutzwald) – Moselle – France
16 Dec 1944 – Saarlautern – Rhineland – Germany
21 Dec 1944 – Neudorf – Luxembourg
23 Dec 1944 – Metz – Moselle – France
24 Dec 1944 – Junglinster – Luxembourg
30 Dec 1944 – Fels – Luxembourg
21 Jan 1945 – Schieren (vic) – Luxembourg
4 Feb 1945 – Junglinster – Luxembourg
6 Feb 1945 – Scheidgen – Luxembourg
18 Feb 1945 – Chateau – Luxembourg
25 Feb 1945 – Nusbaum – Rhineland – Germany
28 Feb 1945 – Messerich – Rhineland – Germany
8 Mar 1945 – Dudeldorf – Rhineland – Germany
10 Mar 1945 – Daun – Rhineland – Germany
12 Mar 1945 – Kaisersesch – Rhineland – Germany , 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
16 Mar 1945 – Treis – Rhineland – Germany
17 Mar 1945 – Kastellaum – Rhineland – Germany
18 Mar 1945 – Simmern – Rhineland – Germany
19 Mar 1945 – Winterburg – Rhineland – Germany
21 Mar 1945 – Wendelsheim – Hessen – Germany
22 Mar 1945 – Undenheim – Hessen – Germany
26 Mar 1945 – Trebur – Hessen – Germany
27 Mar 1945 – Waldorf – Hessen – Germany
27 Mar 1945 – Frankfurt (adv) – Hessen – Germany
29 Mar 1945 – Frankfurt – Hessen – Germany
5 Apr 1945 – Lich – Hessen – Germany
9 Apr 1945 – Bigge – Hessen – Germany
11 Apr 1945 – Merschede – Westphalia – Germany
13 Apr 1945 – Sundern – Westphalia – Germany
15 Apr 1945 – Menden (adv) – Westphalia – Germany
16 Apr 1945 – Menden – Westphalia – Germany
25 Apr 1945 – Langenselvold (adv) – Hessen – Germany
26 Apr 1945 – Langenselvold – Hessen – Germany
26 Apr 1945 – Bamberg – Bavaria – Germany
27 Apr 1945 – Grafenau (adv) – Bavaria – Germany
29 Apr 1945 – Grafenau – Bavaria – Germany
2 May 1945 – Waldkirchen – Bavaria – Germany
5 May 1945 – Bischofsreut – Bavaria – Germany

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge BaseYes ! This post, better said this published archive has been double checked and is released to the the registered members of the European Center of Military History. Of course, I hope that you found some interesting information while reading it. At least I’ve tried to add the maximum I was able to find out.

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, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base
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, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

, 5-ID – OOB – 1944-1945, EUCMH Knowledge Base

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(NB : Published for Good – October 2019)

 

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