Waffen SS – Panzer Corps – Divisions – World War Two

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The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Nazi Party’s SS organization. Its formations included men from Nazi Germany, along with volunteers and conscripts from both occupied and unoccupied lands. The Waffen-SS grew from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, and served alongside the Heer (regular army), Ordnungspolizei (uniformed police) and other security units. Prior to the war, it was under the control of the SS Führungshauptamt (SS operational command office) beneath Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. With the start of World War II, tactical control was exercised by the High Command of the Armed Forces (OKW), with some units being subordinated to Kommandostab Reichsführer-SS (Command Staff Reichsführer-SS) directly under Himmler’s control. Initially, in keeping with the racial policy of Nazi Germany, membership was only open to people of Germanic origin (so-called Aryan ancestry). The rules were partially relaxed in 1940, and later the formation of units composed largely or solely of foreign volunteers and conscripts was authorized. These SS units were made up of men mainly from among the nationals of Nazi-occupied Europe. At the post-war Nuremberg trials the Waffen-SS was judged to be a criminal organization due to its connection to the Nazi Party and involvement in numerous war crimes and crimes against humanity. Former Waffen-SS members were denied many of the rights afforded to the military veterans. An exception was made for Waffen-SS conscripts, who were exempted because they were not volunteers. About a third of the total membership were conscripts.



1.SS-Panzer-Korps
The 1.SS-Panzer-Corps Leibstandarte-SS Adolf Hitler, Commander : SS-Gruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Hermann Priess. The 1.SS.Panzer-Corps was formed in Germany in 1942. On the southern sector of the eastern front during the summer of 1943. Transferred to Belgium in early 1944, where it assumed control of the 1.SS-Panzer-Division and the 12.SS-Panzer-Division. Took part in the Normandy battle and in the withdrawal from France. Refitted under the 6.SS-Panzer-Army in northwest Germany in the autumn of 1944. Took part in the Ardennes counteroffensive in December 1944 and withdrew in January 1945. Believed en route to the eastern front when the war ended.

2.SS-Panzer-Korps
The 2.SS-Panzer-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Willi Bittrich. Formed in Germany in May 1942. Transferred to northern France in July 1942 to control SS infantry divisions reforming as Panzer divisions after having been on the eastern front. Took part in the occupation of former unoccupied France. Transferred to the southern sector of the eastern front in January 1943 and achieved distinction in the recapture of Kharkov and Belgorod in the following March. Transferred to northern Italy in the autumn of 1943 and to France in December 1943. In March 1944, returned to the eastern front, where it controlled the 9.SS-Panzer-Division and the 10.SS-Panzer-Division at Tarnopol. Returned to France in June 1944 and took part in the Normandy battle and in the withdrawal from France. In the autumn of 1944 refitted under the 6.SS-Panzer-Army in northwest Germany. In December 1944 took part. in the Ardennes counter offensive. Withdrew in January 1945 and believed to be en route to the eastern front when the war ended.

3.SS-Panzer-Korps (Germanisches)
The 3.SS-Panzer-Corps (Germanisches), Commander: SS-Obergruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Felix Steiner. Formed in April 1943 to control the training and subsequent operations of the new Scandinavian and Dutch SS divisions. Subsequently stationed in Croatia from September 1943 to the following December, when it was transferred to the northern sector of the eastern front. The 3.SS-Panzer-Corps was on the Latvian coast in January 1945.

4.SS-Panzer-Korps
The 4.SS-Panzer-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Herbert Gille, CoS, SS-Obersturmbannführer Manfred Schonfelder. Formed in France in the summer of 1943 to control SS Panzer divisions forming at that time. In August 1944 transferred to the central sector of the eastern front, where it assumed control of the 3.SS-Panzer-Division and the 5.SS.Panzer-Division and took part in the defense of Warsaw. Transferred to Hungary in the following December and participated in the attempt to relieve the encircled Budapest garrison. The 4.SS-Panzer-Corps was engaged in southwest Hungary in January 1945.

5.SS-Gebirgsjäger-Korps
The 5.SS-Mountain-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer, General der Polizei und der Waffen-SS Friedrich Wilhelm Kruger, CoS, SS-Obersturmbannführer Baldur Keller. Formed in Yugoslavia in the summer of 1943. The 5.SS-Mountain-Korps controlled the 7.SS-Mountain-Division and other regular Army units. The Corps was continuously engaged against partisans before being transferred northward late in 1944. Possibly to Germany.

6.SS-Freiwilligen-Armeekorps
The 6.SS-Volunteer-Army-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Walter Kruger. The Corps was formed in Latvia in April 1944 to control the Latvian SS division. Subsequently, the Corps was continuously engaged on the northern sector of the eastern front. Believed to be on the Latvian coast in January 1945.

7.SS-Panzer-Korps
The 7.SS-Armored-Corps was in existence in October 1944 but disappeared from the Army Roll.

9.SS-Gebirgs-Korps (Kroatisches)
The 9.SS-Mountain-Corps (Croatian), Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer, General der Polizei und der Waffen-SS Karl v. Pfeffer-Wildenbrugh. The Corps was formed in Croatia in the summer of 1944 to control newly formed Albanian and Croatian SS divisions. Subsequently engaged against partisans. The 9.SS-Mountain-Corps was transferred to Hungary where it was responsible for the defense of Budapest in December 1944 and January 1945.

11.SS-Infanterie-Korps
The 11.SS-Infantry-Corps, appeared in southern Poland in late December 1944 and disappeared from the Army roll.

12.SS-Infanterie-Korps
The 12.SS-Infantry-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer, General der Waffen-SS un General der Infanterie Gunther Blumentritt. The 12.SS-Infantry-Corps appeared on the western front in the autumn of 1944. This Corps was created to controls the Army units in the Aachen area.

13.SS-Infanterie-Korps
The 13.SS-Infantry-Corps, Commander : SS-Gruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Max Simon. CoS Oberst i.G. v.Einem. This Infantry Corps was also reported as the 13.SS-Armored-Corps. This Corps probably began forming in Breslau during the month of August 1944. Transferred to the western front in the autumn of 1944 to take charge of units engaged in eastern France. The Corps is reported in the Saar area in January 1945, controlling the 17.SS-Panzergrenadier-Division and associated Army divisions.

14.SS-Korps
The 14.SS-Corps, Commander : SS-Obergruppenführer, General der Polizei und der Waffen-SS Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski. This SS Corps was in the western front, particularly in the Strasbourg, France, area in January 1945. It, then, disappeared from the Army roll.

18.SS-Korps
The 18.SS-Corps, Commander : SS-Gruppenführer, General der Polizei und der Waffen-SS Heinz Reinefarth. The Corps appeared last on the the western front in the Mulhouse area, France, in January 1945. It then disappeared from the Army roll.

1.SS-Panzer-Division (LSSAH)
The 1.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : SS-Oberführer Wilhelm Mohnke. Formed in 1941 as a motorized division by expansion of the elements of the Leibstandarte (Hitler’s Bodyguard Regiment), which had taken part in the campaigns in Poland and in the West as a motorized regiment. During spring, 1941, the division participated in the Balkans’ Campaign and made spectacular flank drive across the Gulf of Corinth then moved to the eastern front, southern sector. The division was transferred to northern France, during the summer of 1942, and reformed as Panzer Division (at first designated SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division). Subsequently returned to the eastern front, southern sector. In March 1943, the 1.SS-Panzer-Division took part in the German counteroffensive to recapture the city of Kharkov the moved to northern Italy for a couple of months before being sent back to the eastern front, southern sector. In November 1943, the division was heavily engaged west of Kiev. Spring 1944 saw the division encircled at Skalla and suffering that much losses, it had to be transferred to Belgium for rest and refitting. In June 1944, the force was sent to Normandy, took part in the battle and withdrew from France back to northwest Germany for rest and refitting. The 1.SS-Panzer-Division was placed under control of the 6.SS-Panzer-Army, sent in reserve in the Aachen area and Euskirchen until December 1944 and the Ardennes counter offensive. Almost entirely destroyed, the division withdrew from the Ardennes area in January 1945 and was en route for Hungary when the war ended.

2.SS-Panzer-Division (Das Reich)
The 2.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Heinz Lammerding. Formed as a motorized division from two regiments of the former SS-Verfugungs-Division, and motorcycle regiment Langemarck during the winter 1940/1941, the 2.SS-Panzer-Division was composed partly of Germanic volunteers. In April 1941 the division was engaged in the Balkans Campaign, in June 1941, in the eastern front, central sector and during the summer of 1942, was transferred to France and, reorganized as a Panzer division (at first designated SS Panzer-Grenadier-Division). Subsequently transferred back to the eastern front, southern sector, the division was also (March 1943) engaged in the German counteroffensive to recapture Kharkov. In November 1943, the division suffered heavy losses west of Kiev, was removed from the battlefield and transferred to southwest France in the Toulouse area for resting and refitting. In June 1944, the 2.SS-Panzer-Division was ordered to Normandy where it was almost entirely destroyed, joined the general German withdrawal trough France and Belgium and was placed under the 6.SS-Panzer-Army’s control in the Aachen area to refit and prepare for the Battle of the Bulge. In January 1945, the 2.SS-Panzer-Division, like all the other German combat units withdrew back to the Reich. The survivors of the division were possibly en route to the eastern front when the war ended.

3.SS-Panzer-Division (Totenkopf)
The 3.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : SS-Brigageführer und General der Waffen-SS Helmuth Becker. Formed in October 1939 as a motorized division mainly from guard units of concentration camps the unit participated to the West Campaign. In August 1940 to June 1941 the unit was located in Bay of Biscay Coast in France. In June 1941, the division moved to the northern sector of the Eastern front. In November 1942 the unit was reorganized as a Panzer division and again transferred to France, as the 3.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, along the Mediterranean coast. Being again transferred to the southern sector of the Eastern front, the 3.SS took part in German counter offensive for recapture of Kharkov in March 1943, was heavily engaged during withdrawal from the lower Dnepr, transferred to the central sector of the Eastern front in July 1944, heavily engaged in the defense of Warsaw. Almost entirely destroyed, the 3.SS was moved to Hungary, and took part in German counterattack west of Budapest, then disappeared from the Army roll.

4.SS-Polizei-Panzer-Grenadier-Division
The 4.SS-Police-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Standartenführer Walter Harzer. This unit was formed in German from members of German police in October 1939. In May 1940, the 4.SS participated in the Holland, Belgium and France Campaign, stayed in France until June 1941 when it was ordered to northern sector of the Eastern front and became continuously engaged. In May 1943 the division was send in Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia to perform security duties with the General Government. During the summer of 1943, the division was transferred to Greece, in September 1944 to Serbia and in November 1944 to Hungary where the division disappeared from the Army roll.

5.SS-Panzer-Division (Viking)
The 5.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : SS-Standartenführer Rudolf Muhlenkamp. In December 1940, the 5.SS was formed as a motorized division from the Germania Regiment of the SS-Verfügungs-Division and two regiments of the Scandinavian, Dutch and Flemish volunteers. Subsequent replacements drawn from Volksdeutsche from the Balkans and from Germanic volunteers. In June 1941 the division was in the southern sector of the Eastern front until the summer of 1942 where it was ordered to Caucasus. Subsequently reformed as Panzer division, the 5.SS being first designated 5.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division. At the end of the Russian winter, in spring 1943, the 5.SS took part in the German counteroffensive between the Don and the Dnepr. In February 1944, encircled at Korsun, the division suffered heavy losses and was moved to the central sector of the Eastern front in April 1944. Engaged in Poland, the division suffered again heavy losses during the counterattack in the Warsaw area. In December 1944, the 5.SS-Panzer-Division was transferred to Hungary, took part in German counterattacks west of Budapest, and many other German outfits disappeared from the Army roll.

6.SS-Gebirgs-Division (Nord)
The 6.SS-Mountain-Division, Commander SS-Gruppenführer, General der Polizei und der Waffen-SS Karl Heinrich Brenner. The 6.SS-Mountain-Division was formed in Austria as mountain division, including many Volksdeutsche early 1941. In June 1941, the division was moved to Finland. Almost continuously on the front in northern Finland. During the Autumn of 1944, the division was transferred to Norway and subsequently to Denmark. In December 1944, the 6.SS Mountain was transferred to the western front and engaged in the Saar area in January 1945.

7.SS-Freiwilligen-Gebirgs-Division (Prinz Eugen)
The 7.SS-Volunteer-Mountain-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Otto Kumm. This unit was formed as a mountain division consisting mainly of Volksdeutsche from Yugoslavia and Rumania, in northern Serbia during the spring of 1942. One year later, it moved to Bosnia and the Dalmatian Coast where it was continuously engaged against partisans. In October 1944, the 7.SS was transferred to the Belgrade area to cover the eastern flank of the German withdrawals through Yugoslavia. The outfit suffered heavy losses and at the end of 1944, elements of the 21.Waffen-Gebirgs-Division-SS (Skanderbeg) believed inc1orporated and name while the name (Skanderbeg) was given to 14.SS-Mountain-Infanterie-Regiment. In January 1945, the reminders of the 7.SS-Mountain-Division where probably still in Serbia before disappearing from the Army roll.

8.SS-Kavallerie-Division (Florian Geyer)
The 8.SS-Cavalry-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Joachim Rumohr. This SS Cavalry unit contained originally two brigades comprising the 15.SS-Kavallerie-Regiment, the 16.SS-Kavallerie-Regiment, the 17.SS-Kavallerie-Regiment and the 18.SS-Kavallerie-Regiment. Two of these regiments moved possibly to the 22.SS-FreiwilligenKavallerie-Division (Hungarian). During the autumn of 1942, the outfit upgraded to division status from the former SS-Cavalry-Brigade which had been engaged on the eastern front since June 1941. The division continued operations on the southern and central sectors of the Eastern front and in late 1943, moved to Yugoslavia, Brod area, then to Hungary. In September 1944, the 8.SS Cavalry moved to the Transylvanian sector of the Eastern front. In December 1944, elements of the unit were encircled at Budapest and, probably, suffered very heavy losses.

9.SS-Panzer-Division (Hohenstaufen)
The 9.SS-PanzerDivision, Commander : SS-Oberführer Sylvester Stadler. Formed early in 194, in northeast France a sa Panzer division, but at first, carried the designation Panzer-Grenadier-Division. In mid 1943, the unit was located in the vicinity of Amiens, in France. It was then transferred to the French Mediterranean coast in February 1944, then, hastily transferred to the eastern front two months later, to take part in German counteroffensive in the Tarnopol area. Moved to France again in June 1944, the 9.SS took part to the Normandy battle and in the withdrawal from France. In September 1944, the division was transferred to northwest Germany for rest and refitting under 6.SS-Panzer-Army control and placed into reserve in the Aachen area. On December 16 1944, the division took part in Ardennes counteroffensive, was severely hit and withdrew, February 1945, from the Ardennes area. The reminders of the division were hiding to the Eastern front at the end of the war.

10.SS-Panzer-Division (Frundsberg)
The 10.SS-Armored -Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Heinz Harmel. Formed during the winter 1942-1943 in southwest France as sister unit to SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Hohenstaufen) and designated at first SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Karl der Grosse) the 10.SS was transferred to southeast France in mid 1943. A couple of months later the unit moved to Normandy until March 1944 when it was hastily transferred to the Eastern front to take part in the German counteroffensive in the Tarnopol area. In June 1944, the division was sent back to France for the Normandy Campaign and subsequent withdrawal from France. In September 1944, the 9.SS was engaged in Holland then was, in November, transferred to the Aachen area in Germany. In January 1945, the 9.SS-Panzer was moved to the Saar area and subsequently engaged in Alsace and the withdrawal into Germany until it disappeared from the Army roll.

11.SS-Freiwilligen-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Nordland)
The 11.SS-Volunteer-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Joachim Ziegler. In mid 1943, the 11.SS was formed in Germany as a motorized division around nucleus of the (Nordland) Regiment of SS Division (Wiking). This unit consists partly of Norwegian and Danish volunteers and partly of Volksdeutshe from the Balkans. In September 1943, the division was located in northern, Croatia. In January 1944, the unit moved to the northern sector of the Eastern front. The 11.SS was also engaged during the withdrawal from the Leningrad area and in August heavily engaged at the Narva bridgehead. In October 1944, the division withdrew to the Latvian coast until it disappeared from the Army roll.

12.SS-Panzer-Division (Hitlerjugend)
The 12.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : SS-Standartenführer Hugo Kraas. The 12.SS-Panzer was activated in Belgium as a Panzer division during the summer of 1943. Consisted largely of recruits from military fitness camps of the Hitler Youth and of cadres from 1.SS-Panzer-Division (Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler), the division remained in Belgium, serving principally as training unit for other SS divisions. In April 1944, the 12.SS was transferred to Normandy, took part of the Normandy Campaign, was insanely destroyed, the reminders of the division being a part of the German withdrawal from France. The division was also ordered to northwest Germany fro rest and refitting, placed under control of the 6.SS-Panzer-Army and sent in reserve in the Aachen area unti December 16 1944 and the Ardennes counteroffensive. In January 1945, the 12.SS withdrew from the Ardennes area heading for Bavaria and Austria where it disappeared from the Army roll.

13.Waffen-Gebirgs-Division-SS (Handschar)
The 13.SS-Mountain-Division (Croatian), Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Hampel. Spring 1943 : Began forming as mountain division with Bosnian Moslem and Croat volunteers and probably cadre from the SS-FreiwilligenGebirgs-Division (Prinz Eugen). At first, the division was called the BH, the (Bosnian-Herzegovinian) Division. Many Moslems and some Christians from the Croatian National Army were forced into the division when recruiting of volunteers lagged. Personnel considered very unreliable and subject to desertion. In September 1943, the division was located in south-central France. in November 1943, in lower Silesia. In December, in Austria. in January 1944 the division moved to Slovenia until December when it was transferred to the southern Hungarian sector of the Eastern front.

14.Waffen-Grenadier-Division-SS (Galizische)
The 14.SS-Infantry-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Fritz Freitag. Formed in April 1943 from Ukrainian volunteers under the command of German and Austrian officers and NCOs, the un it trained in Galicia. In March 1944, the unit was located on the central sector of the Eastern front, in southern Poland. In July 1944 the division suffered heavy losses in the southern part of Poland during the Soviet sum­mer offensive. Transferred to Germany for reforming. Subsequently returned to the central sector of the Eastern front.

15.Waffen-Grenadier-Division-SS (Lettische)
The 15.SS-Infantry-Division, Commander: SS-Oberführer Nikolaus Heilmann. Formed August 1943 as infantry division from Latvian volunteer and police battalions containing only a few German officers and NCOs. Autumn 1943 : Eastern front, northern sector. Autumn 1944 : Possibly in Germany or Latvia. January 1945 : Possibly on the Latvian coast.

16.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Reichsfilhrer-SS)
The 16.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Oberführer Otto Baum. October 1943 : Formed in Slovenia as a Panzer Grenadier Division by expansion of the assault brigade of the same name, which had been engaged in Corsica. In February 1944 : Elements of the division were engaged at the Anzio beachhead; other elements remained in Slovenia. In March 1944 : Elements took part in occupation of Hungary; other elements remained at the Anzio beachhead. In July 1944 : the entire division was on the Italian front. Continuously engaged and absorbed the SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Lehr-Regiment. In December 1944 the division returned to the Hungarian sector of the Eastern front.

17.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Gotz von Berlichingen)
The 17.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Standartenführer Fritz Klingenberg. Formed in October 1943, in western France and as Panzer Grenadier Division, including numerous Belgians and Rumanians. In June 1944, the 17.SS took part in Normandy Campaign, suffered heavy losses, withdrew, refitted in France in September 1944 and incorporated 49.SS-Panzer-Gernadier and the 51.SS-Panzer-Gernadier Brigades which were moved down from Denmark and first intended to form new 26.SS-Panzer-Division and the 27.SS-Panzer-Division. The 17.SS engaged then in Eastern France until sent down to the Saar area on January 1945.

18.SS-Freiwilligen-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Horst Wessel)
The 18.SS-Volunteer-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Standartenführer Wilhelm Trabandt. The 18.SS was formed in Hungary during the spring of 1944 by the expansion of 1.SS-Motorized-Infantry-Brigade which had been continuously engaged in the Eastern front since 1942. In July 1944, the division was transferred to the central sector of the Eastern front, in southern Poland. In October 1944, the 18.SS was transferred to Slovakia and engaged against partisans.

19.SS-Waffen-Grenadier-Division (Lettische II)
The 19.SS-Infantry-Division, Commander : SS-Gruppenführer und General der Waffen-SS Bruno Streckenbach. Formed in March 1944 on the northern sector of the Eastern front with the reminders od the 2.SS-Latvian-Volunteer-Brigade, which had been on the northern sector since the winter 1943-1944 and heavily engaged. The 19.SS was along the Latvia coast on December 1944.

20.Waffern-Grenadier-Division-SS (Estnische)
The 20.SS-Infantry- Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Franz Augsberger. Formed in December 1943 in the central sector of the Eastern front from the reminders of the Estonian SS Brigage which had been on the central sector since the month of October 1943. Subsequently transferred to the northern sector, the 20.SS was engaged in the Narva area in April 1944. Transferred to Germany for rest and refitting during the month of October 1944, the division was sent back to the central sector of the Eastern front in December 1944.

21.Waffen-Gebirgs-Division-SS (Skanderbeg)(Albanische)
The 21.SS-Mountain-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS August Schmidhuber. Formed in the mid 1944 in the Balkans, this division consisted of Albanian personnel, considered unreliable. Believed disbanded and most of the personnel absorbed by the 14.SS-Mountain-Infantry-Regiment of the 7.SS-Mountain-Division.

22.Freiwilligen-Kavallerie-Division-SS (Ungarisch)
The 22.SS-Cavalry-Division, Commander : SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS August Zehender. Believed to be organized along the lines similar to the 8.SS-Cavalry-Division and possibly to have taken over two cavalry regiments from that division. These regiments carried two of the three numbers 15, 17, and 18. Formed in mid 1944 in Hungary, the 22.SS was transferred to northern Transylvania and in December, the unit, encircled at Budapest, probably suffered very heavy casualties and disappeared from the Army roll.

23.Waffen-Gebirgs-Division-SS (Kama)(Kroatische II)
The 23. SS-Mountain-Division, Commander : Unknown. Formed in the summer of 1944 with Bosnian Moslem, Croatian volunteers, and German Cadres, the division is considered as disbanded or destroyed when the war ended.

24.Waffen-Gebirgs-Karstjäger-Division-SS
The 24.SS-Mountain-Division, Commander : Unknown. Formed in the autumn of 1944 in Italy, in the Istrian area by expansion of the Karstjäger Battalion (known as Karstwehr Battalion in late 1943) of the Waffen-SS. Reported staffed by Austrian officers from 7.SS-Freiwilligen-Gebirgs-Division (Prinz Eugen). This division may include many Italians.

26.SS-Panzer-?-Division (Hunyadi)
The 26.SS-Panzer-Division, Commander : Unknown. An unsuccessful attempt was made to form a division of this number out of the 49.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Brigade in September 1944. Subsequently, the division began to be formed in northwest Germany, probably with troops from SS-Panzer-Brigade (Gross), was disbanded in November 1944, and young personnel evacuated from Transylvania.

27.SS-Freiwilligen-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Langemarck)
The 27.-SS-Volunteer-Panzer-Division, Commander : Unknown. An unsuccessful attempt was made to form this division from the 51.SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Brigade in September 1944. Subsequently the number was given to SS-Freiwilligen-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Langemarck), which was upgraded from the 6.SS-Freiwilligen-Sturmbrigade (Langemarck) in autumn of 1944. This brigade, activated in the autumn of 1943, had distinguished itself during heavy combats on the Eastern front in the spring of 1944.

28.SS-Freiwilligen-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Wallonien)
The 28.SS-Volunteer-Panzer-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Sturmbannführer Leon Degrelle. Personnel, mainly Belgian, including prisoner of war Volunteers. Formed during the summer of 1944 in Silesia, by expansion of 5.SS-Freiwilligen-Sturmbrigade (Wallonien) which had fought on the Eastern front and suffered heavy losses in the Korsun encirclement. Late autumn 1944, the 28.SS was transferred to the Hannover area in Germany and in December in the Bonn area.

29.SS-Division
The 29.SS-Division, Commander : Unknown. October 1944, possibly on the Eastern front, central sector, Warsaw area.

30.Waffen-Grenadier-Division-SS (Russische II)
The 30.SS-Grenadier-Division, Commander : SS-Obersturmbannführer und Oberstleutnant der Polizei Hans Siegling. Summer 1944. Formed mainly of Soviet personnel, probably with police experience, and small proportion of former German police. This division was in East France in September 1944 and transferred to Germany, in October 1944, because the personnel was considered unreliable. In November 1944 the division was engaged in Alsace and a month later, in December 1944, withdrew east of the Rhine River.

31.Waffen-Grenadier-Division-SS
The 31.SS-Grenadier-Division. Commander : Unknown. Believed to be formed in the Balkans in September 1944, this unit was last seen in southwest Hungary in December 1944 and then disappeared from the Army roll.

33.SS-Freiwilligen-Division (Charlemagne)
The 33.SS-Volunteer-Division (Charlemagne) Commander : (February 1945) SS-Oberführer Edgar Puaud, (March 1945) SS-Brigadeführer und General der Waffen-SS Gustav Krukenberg, (April 1945) SS-Standartenführer Walter Zimmermann. Not to be confused with the former SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Division (Karl der Grosse), which was redesignated 10.SS-Panzer-Division (Frundsberg). December 1944 : Probably formed at Wildfiecken maneuver area by expansion of the former Waffen-Grenadier-Sturmbrigade der SS Frankreich division formed near Prag in the spring of 1944. The 33.SS consists largely of French and other foreign personnel. In January 1945, this 33.SS was located in western Germany.

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