106-ID – OOB – 1944-1945

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The 106th Infantry Division was assembled on May 5 1942 and added to the Role of the US Army. Almost a year later, the Division was activated on March 15 1943 with the cadres from the 80th Infantry Division at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. On March 28 1944, the Golden Lions moved to Camp Atterbury, Indiana, then staged at Camp Miles Standish, Massachusetts until October 10 1944, when part of the Division went back to the New York Port of Embarkation (422-RCT) for oversea shipping and arrived in England on November 17 1944. The men trained for 19 days when movement orders were received, assigning the 106-ID to the 12-AG (Gen Omar N. Bradley), VIII Corps (Gen Emil F. Reinhardt), 1-A (Gen Courtney H. Hodges) on November 29 1944. The division moved then to France on December 6 1944, where the division joined the ongoing Rhineland Campaign. Finally, the 106-ID crossed into Belgium, December 10 1944, was relieved from assignment to Rhineland Campaign on December 16, and assigned to Ardennes-Alsace Campaign.

Relieved from assignment to Reinhardt’s VIII Corps, and assigned on December 20 to the XVIII Airborne Corps (Gen Matthew B. Ridgway), 1-A, 12-AG, with attachment to Montgomery’s 21-AG, the 106-ID was relieved from attachment to the 21-AG on January 18 1945, and returned to Ridgway’s XVIII Airborne Corps, 1-A, 12-AG. The Ardennes-Alsace Campaign (Battle of the Bulge) terminated on January 25, and the division resumed assignment to the Rhineland Campaign.
On February 6, the 106-ID was relieved from assignment to the XVIII Airborne Corps, and assigned to the V Corps (Gen Clarence R. Huebner). On March 10, 106-ID was relieved from assignment to the V Corps, and assigned to the US 15-A (Gen Leonard T. Gerow), 12-AG. The Division returned to France on March 16, the Rhineland Campaign terminated on March 21, the Central Europe Campaign started on March 22, and on April 15, the 106-ID was attached to the Advanced Section, Communications Zone. Gerow’s 15-A directed the establishment of the Frontier Command segment of the Occupation of Germany, on April 23, the Frontier Command segment of the German Occupation started and the 106-ID entered Germany on April 25. On May 8 1945, the Germany signed its surrender and with the termination of the Central Europe Campaign, the German hostilities ceased on May 11. The 106-ID, located at Bad Ems, left Germany and arrived on October 1 to the New York Port of Embarkation. The Division was then inactivated at Camp Shanks, New York on October 2 1945.

Casualties

Killed in Action : 417
Wounded in Action : 1278
Died of Wounds : 53
Prisoners of War : 6697



106th Infantry Division : Commanders
Maj Gen Alan W. Jones – March 1943 – December 1944
Brig Gen Herbert T. Perrin – December 1944 – February 1945
Maj Gen Donald A. Stroh – February 1945 – October 1945

106-ID – OOB 1944-1945
Hq & Hq Co, 106th Infantry Division
Hq Battery, Divison Artillery
Hq Special Troops
81st Engineer Combat Battalion
106th Counter Intelligence Corps Det
106th Quartermaster Company
106th Reconnaissance Troop, Mecz
106th Signal Company
331 st Medical Battalion
422nd Infantry Regiment
423rd Infantry Regiment
424th Infantry Regiment
589th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
590th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
591st Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
592nd Field Artillery Battalion (155mm)
806th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
Military Police Platoon
440th AAA-Auto-Wpns Battalion (17-12-1944 – 25-12-1944)
563rd AAA-Auto-Wpns Battalion (09-12-1944 – 18-12-1944)
634th AAA Auto-Wpns Battalion (08-12-1944 – 18-12-1944)
820th Tank Destroyer Battalion (08-12-1944 – 04-01-1945)

106-ID – OOB – 1945
Hq & Hq Co, 106th Infantry Division
Hq Battery, Division Artillery
Hq Special Troops
3rd Infantry Regiment

Attached to division 03-16-1945 – 09-05-1945
to replace the 422-IRb and the 423-IR

81st Engineer Combat Battalion
106th Counter Intelligence Corps Det
106th Quartermaster Company
106th Reconnaissance Troop, Mecz
106th Signal Company
159th Infantry Regiment

Attached to division 03-16-1945 – 09-05-1945
to replace the 422-IR and the 423-IR


331st Medical Battalion
424th Infantry Regiment
589th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
590th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
591st Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
592nd Field Artillery Battalion (155mm)
806th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
Military Police Platoon

Narrative

The 106th Infantry Division landed in France on December 6 1944 and was sent to Belgium to relieve the battle weary 2nd Infantry Division in the Schnee Eifel sector of Belgium on December 11. The German Ardennes counter offensive struck the division on December 16, the 422 and 423-IRs were in the triangle St Vith, Schoenberg, Manderfeld, Bleialf while the 424-IR was at Winterspelt.

Both, the 422 and the 423-IRs surrendered on December 19 1944 after being encircled in their area near Schoenberg the previous day.

The 424-IR was pushed back across the Our River, losing most of its equipment, and joined other divisional remnants to hold St Vith on December 20 and 21 1944, being reinforced by the 112/28-ID on December 19 to 23 1944.

From December 24 to 30, the 424-IR was attached to the 7-AD and participated in heavy combat around Manhay, and then was withdrawn to Anthisnes Belgium. The 424-IR took over defense of the Wanne – Wanneranval region on January 9 1945 and the division had a second regiment attached, the separate 517-PIR (January 11 to January 17). On January 15, the division consolidated and cleared Ennal. It then assembled at Stavelot on January 18 and the 424-IR was again attached to the 7-AD (January 23 to Jauary 28) where it fought at Meyerode and in the St Vith vicinity.

The division moved to Hunnigen on February 7, and the 424th Infantry Regt was attached to the 99th Infantry Division Feb 5 to Feb 9. The 424th then advanced along the high ground between the Berk and Simmer River until it reached Olds on Mar 7 1945.

It was then sent for rehabilitation and the division given a security mission along the Rhine River until March 15 1945, when the division was withdrawn to St Quentin to be rebuilt.

The division was reconstituted on March 16 1945 when the 3rd Infantry Regiment and 159th Infantry Regiment were attached to replace its surrendered regiments. It then moved back into Germany on April 25 but was relegated to duty processing prisoners and performing military occupation of secure areas.

The 422nd and 423rd Infantry Regiments were newly formed in France from replacements and attached to the 66th Infantry Division for training purposes on April 15, and were still in this capacity when hostilities were declared ended on May 7 1945.

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(NB : Published for Good – October 2019)

 

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