EUCMH Lost Tracks

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    The European Center of Military History offers to the users and visitors a really simple way to ask for help or information about an ancestor who served in the Armed Forces during World War Two.

    To do this, just use the comment panel bellow this page and type in what you are locking for. Many peoples will read your request as well as I will to which is the great part of it because in 2018 I found not only two fathers but also wartime photos of the two men.

    Good Luck

    Doc Snafu

    Just in !
    Wow! I never knew that so much archived and collected history was gathered up, especially by one man. My Dad was killed in action on March 16, 1945, 2 weeks after I was born (March 2), in Beulich, Rhineland, Germany. He was in a detachment of the 90th Infantry, and was a machine gun specialist. I don’t know enough about him, because no one in my family talked much about him. Most of the members of my family (on that side) are gone, now, and I only have an 86-year old aunt to use as a reference.

    I am trying to research as much as I can (I’m 73, going on 74,) and I’m doing a genealogical search. My Mom was married three times, all to WW II heroes, and my family tree is so gnarled with twigs and branches, that it’s very hard to know where to start. My Dad’s name was Morton Kirshner; he was known as “Smiley.” His G.I. number was Pfc.12184510.

    According to a letter my Mother had, Smiley was : Acting Machine Gun Sergeant in the 502nd AAA on gun mount for nine months; was cannoneer and machine gunner for eight months with the 571st Half-Track outfit on the M-16 track equipped with the M-51 mount; was Chief machine gunner with the 836th AAA; had charge of the of the M-51 multiple machine gun caliber 50 mount and crews.

    At time this letter was written he was in Company B, 137th Infantry Training Battalion at Camp Livingston, Louisiana,(December 19, 1944). Mr. Gillot, if you can find out whether or not any survivors exist who knew my Father, and perhaps have a passing memory of him, I would greatly appreciate your efforts in putting me in contact with your fellow heroes. Thanks so much for your kind attention to this now and in the future and thanks for the formidable task you have taken upon yourself.
    Jay Elzweig (my adoptive name) email.
    My landline is 631-262-0169 (Northport, New York)

    Karen is searching for info on her father :

    Elroy E. Bennett; Born July 27 1915, Buena Vista, Wisconsin
    Entered service 12 June 1941; discharged on 31 Oct 1945
    ASN 36212663
    Company he was discharge from, Battery C, 551st Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion
    Military Specialty : Rifleman 745

    There are records of him coming home on leave in Jan of 1942 (stationed in New Jersey at the time) and again in June of 1942 (Stationed in Delaware at that time). Places he stationed: New Jersey, 1941; Delaware 1942; Washington D.C. date unknown (has a patch on shoulder in wedding picture dated 1943 that is insignia on the troops who guarded the Capital, believe it was 12th.

    From his DD214, departure date sated 10 Jan 1945 arrival date 22 Jan 1945 ETO destination; date of departure 16 Oct 1945 destination USA arrival 25 Oct 1945; time in service 3 years 7 months and 2 days foreign service 9 months and 16 days. Reason for separation AR 615-365 RR 1-1 (Con of Gov’t 15 Dec 1944 Demobilization. Number stamped on discharge is 3985299 Varo Milw. Wis.

    Does any of this make any sense to you, I am not military but would like to find out more. I can scan this discharge paper and some pictures if that would help?
    My father went to Fort Bening Ga. in 1943, account say my mother was on her way to be with him when her train crashed between Delaware and Ga. in the crash she lost the daughter they were having. My father from my mother’s account was shipped out from Fort Bening, on the way to the oversea base he was transferred three times from one ship to another. My mother got a telegram in early 1945 of my father missing in action (about March), my brother was born June 1945 and he was 9 months old when my father was found and came home. How do I find out where he was and what happened to him. I know he would never talk about the service and what happened to him, my mother said he was a broken man when he came home and took many years for him to enjoy many things.
    Please contact Karen if you can help