1st Infantry Division (16-IR) – June 6 1944 (AAR) Omaha Beach

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Journal entries, 16-IR, 1-ID, June 6 1944

0630- First wave lands on schedule on beach of Normandy, France, and meets fierce resistance on beaches. Beach is under heavy machine gun and rifle fire. No advance made inland as beaches were fully covered by pill boxes and mine fields just inland from beaches

0730- Forward CP lands. Beach still under small arms and machine gun fire. No advance made inland. Casualties extremely heavy. Slight artillery fire on the beach. Heavy machine gun fire covering all exits and the entire beach

0805- Rear CP lands. Beach still under heavy fire. CP established on beach and infiltration started thru right flank of area at small break thru. Mine field cleared out and all troops on beach commence moving of to flank

0830- First four prisoners all from 8.Company, 916.Regiment, 352.Division, brought in


1000- CP established just off beach on side of hill at 984895. Battalions are moving forward, but are out of contact with regimental CP. Beach and entire territory still under heavy fire and companies are meeting heavy resistance. Several landing craft have received hits and troops still landing on the beach are receiving artillery fire, causing medium casualties. Things are becoming organized, however, and the situation is beginning to clear

1055- 1st and 2nd Bns get contact with the Regimental CP and are moving forward slowly, hitting very heavy resistance

1115- CO to CO 2nd Bn : Hold up at 38. Right, and we have contact with 2nd Bn. The 5.Company is reported to be located at Surrain

1135- Negative report to Division by radio

1145- S-3 to EX 1st Bn/2nd Bn : 18th has landed. They will go in on your right. They will take your objective. You dip in and prepare for a counterattack, OK
– Able is on the right
– Charlie on the left – Baker following
We are still advancing slowly

1145- S-3 to CO 2nd Bn : I talked to Capt Smith and told him about the 18th. How soon can you move rear part of your CP here by us up forward ?
– We have someone on the way back now to pick them up and guide them forward

1205- EX 1st Bn to CO : Can we get any tanks up to Colleville-sur-Mer ?
– Able : No, none of them are up to here yet. They aren’t off the beach. However, as soon as we can possible get anything up, we will shoot it up to you. Kept yelling for it.

1210- CO Charlie an CO to S-3 : We must have tanks or artillery up here soon. Will you see what you can do about it for us ?
– Able, OK

1220- Information received that the 3/18th Inf, was in, but location at the present time was not given. Probably only a rumor

1223- Message to CO 3rd Bn & 2nd Bn. Has had units in Colleville-sur-Mer for some time. 1st Bn. Landed on the left of E-1 and is pushing in to assist the 2nd Bn. In taking its objective

1232- EX 1st Bn to S-2, Able is at 678892. Part of Baker is with them, and the rest is in reserve. We are going over to Point 19 first, and then towards 38. Charlie is at 681884, moving very slowly. Capt Merendino, Baker said he lost about 12 men from pill boxes firing on them. He couldn’t get contact with the Battalion. Maj Driscoll said he wanted him over on the right
– Maj Driscoll to S-3 : We are 100 yards NW of 20. We are still pushing

1255- In with 3rd Bn. by wire

1245- Msg to CG 1st Div : Prisoners stated that the CP 10.Company, 726.Regiment at St Laurent-sur-Mer. CP 12.Company, 726.Regiment at Grandcamp-les-Bains. That is in the 116th Sector. 916.Regiment in sector of 16th Inf. CP, 5.Company, 916.Regiment at Surrain. The 916. relieved the 915. two weeks ago

1301- Out by wire with 2nd Bn

1312- 1/18th Inf, lands and is passing thru the CP area, moving forward

1318- Maj Lauten to 1st Bn : Lt Kolb is trying to find your CP and will follow the wire line up

1326- S-3 to 2nd Bn Fwd : Where are you ?
– CP is now moving forward. We are not in contact with them just now. They took a radio with them to keep in contact with us

1327- S-3 to 1st Bn : Are you with Maj Driscoll now ?
– No, he is at the forward CP and we can’t contact him now. However, I can give you the dope
– Able Co pinned down by a strong point, just at the head of the draw at E-2, over by 20, West of Colleville
– Baker Co is going along, sending a couple of sections over to help out Charlie Co
– Charlie Co is 100 yards NW of Point 20.
– Naval Shore Fire Control Party is out with Major Driscoll now
– 2nd Bn is held down
– We are in buildings S and E of 20
– There is stuff all around
– S-3 : Artillery fire is coming in on the beach now
– Well, I can’t see where it is coming from up here

1355- White out by wire

1422- More prisoners brought in. Prisoners have been coming in by twos and threes since the landing

1425- Msg. 2nd Bn to CO Item held up at Point 8. Item unable to assemble forces to advance and has enemy infiltrating his position. Love same situation as Item. Item and Love are just beyond Point 9. Tanks and reinforcements needed. Time : 1330

1440- 1st Bn to S-2 Charlie the same as before, and Baker has moved up to the right of them. There is no other change

1502- S-2 to 2nd Bn ? Have they cleaned out the town yet ?
– last report I had a half-hour ago was that they were just on the outskirts of the town. I will check by the 300 set and let you know

1515- 2nd Bn to S-2 Capt Dawson started into the town. He had a small counter-attack. He had a couple of sections as far as the church. Wozenski is trying to clean up. Dogtag is going thru the town.
– S-3 : Halftracks are in. I am sending them up. What is you CP location ?
– CP is at 683885. We have contact with the 1st Bn only by means of passing men. The 2/18th, is passing through. Easy is working up on the right, between George and Red. We received information from a civilian that there were about 150 Jerries in Colleville-sur-Mer. We have only about 200 men left; 115 in Goerge, 2 officers and 40 men in Easy, and 2 officers and 12 men in Fox. There are possibly 20 more around

1540- 2nd Bn to S-2 : What is the latest with Blue ?
– Not so good. Part of Item didn’t land. Very low on strength

1540- 1st Bn to S-2 : Charlie is moving very slowly. Baker is on our Right, moving slowly, because of machine gun fire. As far as we know, Able is in the same spot

1640- S-2 to switchboard : Are we in with Danger Advance ?
– No, sir

1725- In by wire with Decoy

1800- Capt Smith, 1st Bn to S-2 : Maj Driscoll says we need stuff up here to take out these pillboxes. If we can’t get it, we will be held up. We’re leaving this for your consideration

1830- 26th Infantry started landing on beach at 1830. A few enemy artillery shells landed near them along the beach. Shortly after, the cruisers and artillery guns opened up for a short period of time

1935- Cruisers and ships firing heavy counter battery on guns firing on beach

1940/- Enemy barrage of artillery landing along the beach where the troops are landing. Casualties light

2045- S-4 to Danger 6 : Do you have an ammunition supply ?
– We don’t have any as of yet
– S-4 : Do you have any transportation in yet ?
– No. We are getting some in on DUWKs and as soon as they come in, we will send out one of the DUWKs with ammunition. It will come in at E-1

2048- Delight line is out

2100- Capt Robbins to Maj Heath ? A German prisoner had two maps on him with 3 spots underlined. Believe they are strong points. These are at 659874, in vicinity of the road; 665874, running along the road junction and road north of it at 666875; and at Surrain, they had underlined around 670859. Very little change

2115- Col Pickett, Div Sig, to Mr Wiles ? What is your equipment status ?
– We are very short on our signal equipment. All the men that were carrying equipment were hit and we had to salvage what we could off the beach
– Col Pickett : OK. I will try to get you another signal crew and what equipment I can

2124- Capt Bour, White 1, to S-1 : Any improvement on the evacuation of wounded ?
– If at all possible, we will send them out to the ships tonight. Send them up to us as soon as you can, and we will take care of getting them out

2140- S3 18th to S3 : Williamson is located just north of goose egg on your map. One company at 702872, one at 702872, one at 695873, and one at 788875. They are advancing to the high ground and then will move toward the West. We are holding back out 1st Bn Do you have anyone in Colleville ?
– Not that we know
– S3 18th : Is your 2nd Bn at 682878 and your 1st Bn at 679878 ?
– Yes, that is right

2145- Danger 2 to S2 : What’s the situation in front of you ?
– Very vague. There is a pill box in the draw near Colleville, and its causing us trouble
– G2 : Is the enemy close to the edge of Colleville ?
– the 18th is at the top of the hill south of Colleville, but our right flank is still held by the enemy. There is no enemy North of the road except at E-3 exit, where there is a pill box. There’s a heavy gun at Formigny and a few small ones at Russy. A few tanks were seen yesterday in Colleville
– G2 : What about your left company ?
– They are on the edge of Le Hamel
– G2 : Did you run into any tanks ?
– No reports of any today. We got prisoners from 10. and 14. companies. 916. is the only company we are in contact with now
– G2 : There is a lot of shelling from the southeast and the Maisy area

2205- G3 to S3 : Any more dope on your two units near Colleville ? The general says that place must be cleaned out tonight. The 18th has two battalions in front of you
– No, no more dope on that

2242- Danger 4 to S3 : Do you know where the temporary vehicle area is ?
– Yes. It is at Ex-1. Capt Fish has been out there
– G4 : I’m setting up a temporary ammunition dump there. The ammunition will be rationed. Do you know anything about the 116 ?
– Yes. They are getting along OK. They are southwest of St Laurent

2255- Capt Toby, 7-FAB to S2 : I had a report from a Medic that people in St Laurent had 29 Jerries billeted with them. They left tonigh and were to meet in Louvieres

2257- S2 to danger 2 : Col Evans, we had a report from the 7-FAB, who talked to some civilians who said that the 29 Officers who had been billeted at St Laurent. They were gone tonight and the officers were to meet at Louvieres

2300- Maj Tegtmeyer to Col Ficchy : We are not able to evacuate any of our people. There are no evacuation facilities at the beach and something must be done
– We will try and see that this is taken care of at once

2310- CO 2nd Bn to S2 : Can you give me any dope ?
– Yes. Two battalions of the 18th are on that hill by you
– OK
– People are infiltrating. We are digging in and need reorganization. Tell the Colonel

2310- Air raid on ships, beach, and short distance inland

Group #2

#1 SHAEF (Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force) incoming messages from Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower to Gen George C. Marshall COS concerning the first reports of the Normandy landings June 6 1944
#2 SHAEF message from Gen Eisenhower to Gen Marshall reporting on D-Day landing area, June 8, 1944

Top Secret Eyes Only
SHAEF STAFF MESSAGE CONTROL
INCOMING MESSAGE
SHAEF CP
SHAEF 83/06
Filed 060800B June
TOR 060930B June

URGENT

FROM : SHAEF COMMAND POST, PERSONAL FROM GENERAL EISENHOWER
TO : AGNAR-TO GENERAL MARSHALL FOR HIS EYES ONLY, SHAEF FOR INFORMATION

REF NO : 90016, 6 June 1944
Local time is now 8 in the morning.

I have as yet no information concerning the actual landings nor of our progress through the beach obstacles. Communique will not be issued until we have word that leading ground troops are actually ashore.

All preliminary reports are satisfactory. Airborne formations apparently landed in good order with losses out of approximately 1250 airplanes participating about 30. Preliminary bombings by air went off as scheduled. Navy reports sweeping some mines, but so far as is known channels are clear and operation proceeding as planned. In early morning hours reaction from shore batteries was sufficiently light that some of the naval spotting planes have returned awaiting call.

The weather yesterday which was original date selected was impossible all along the target coast. Today conditions are vastly improved by sea and air and we have the prospect of at least reasonably favorable weather for the next several days.

Yesterday, I visited British troops about to embark and last night saw a great portion of a United States airborne division just prior to its takeoff. The enthusiasm, toughness, and obvious fitness of every single man were high and the light of battle was in their eyes.

I will keep you informed.

DISTRIBUTION :
1. SUPREME COMMANDER
2. CHIEF OF STAFF
3. SGS
4. Gen Strong (G-2)
5. Gen Bull (G-3)

TOP SECRET
AT NOON ON JUNE SEVENTH GENERAL BRADLEY FELT THAT CONDITIONS WERE IMPROVING ON O BEACH AND STEPS ARE BEING TAKEN TO REPLACE ARTILLERY WHICH WAS LOST IN LANDING DUE TO HOSTILE ARTILLERY FIRE AND SINKING OF LANDING CRAFT PD BECAUSE OF THE CONFIGURATION OF THE GROUND IN THIS PARTICULAR AREA SPOTTING FOR NAVAL GUNFIRE WAS RATHER DIFFICULT AND SINCE TROUBLE CAME FROM FIELD WORKS RATHER THAN FROM FIXED BATTERIES CMA BOTH AIR BOMBARDMENT AND NAVAL GUNFIRE WERE RELATIVELY / PART TWO INEFFECTIVE IN ASSISTING THE LANDING PD PARAGRAPH ON THE WHOLE US REPEAT UNCLE SUGAR ARMY FRONT THE IMMEDIATE TACTICAL PLAN HAS BEEN ALERTED WITH THE PURPOSE NOW OF BOTH CORPS MAKING AN EARLY DRIVE TOWARD CARENTAN TO JOIN UP CMA AFTER WHICH THE ORIGINAL CONCEPTIONS WILL BE PURSUED PD PARAGRAPH ON THE FRONT OF THE FIFTIETH BRITISH DIVISION PROGRESS WAS VERY GOOD ALTHOUGH CMA AS AT EVERYWHERE ELSE CMA UNLOADING WAS INTERFERED WITH BY THE ROUGH WEATHER PD LIKEWISE ON THE FRONTS OF THE THIRD BRITISH AND THIRD CANADIAN DIVISIONS PROGRESS WAS GENERAL SATISFACTORY ALTHOUGH ROUGH WEATHER HAD FINALLY COMPELLED THE NAVAL FORCE COMMANDER TO DIRECT THE DRYING OUT OF LST’S BECAUSE RHINO FERRIES COULD NOT WORK PD ON THIS PARTICULAR FRONT THE BEACHES WERE FLAT AND HARD ANT IT WAS BELIEVED THAT NO DAMAGE WOULD RESULT TO THE LST’S PD PARAGRAPH THROUGHOUT THE FRONT WE LOST CONSIDERABLE NUMBERS OF THE SMALLER LANDING CRAFT CMA BOTH BECAUSE OF ROUGH WEATHER AND MINES IN THE TOUCHDOWN AREAS PD THESE WERE TELLER MINES WHICH BLEW SIZEABLE HOLES IN THE LANDING CRAT BUT LARGE NUMBERS OF WHICH CAN BE REPAIRED AS SOON AS MAINTENANCE GROUPS CAN BE PLACED ASHORE AND START TO WORK PD THE LOSS OF THESE CRAFT CMA ADDED TO THE ROUGH WEATHER SLOWED UP THE LANDING OF ALL SUPPLIES AND AT NOON ON D PLUS ONE WE WERE APPROXIMATELY TWENTY FOUR HOURS BEHIND OUR EXPECTED SCHEDULE OF UNLOADING PD THE WEATHER IMPROVED MARKEDLY AT NOON ON D PLUS ONE PD IF THIS CCS, SCAF 48 GOOD WEATHER STRETCH CAN BE PROLONGED FOR A FEW DAYS WE WILL DO MUCH TOWARD CATCHING UP PD PARAGRAPH DURING/PART THREE THE COURSE OF THE DAY I TALKED WITH GENERAL MONTGOMERY AND GENERAL BRADLEY AND WITH ADMIRALS KIRK CMA VIAN CMA DOUGLAS PENNANT AND OLIVER PD ALL WERE DISAPPOINTED IN THE UNFAVORABLE LANDING CONDITIONS AND ALL FELT THAT IMPROVEMENT OF THE WEATHER WOULD SEE A CORRESPONDING GREAT IMPROVEMENT IN OUR POSITION PD PARAGRAPH UPON RETURN OF ADMIRAL RAMSAY AND MYSELF TO ADVANCE HEADQUARTERS ABOUT TEN P M WE LEARNED THAT WE HAD APPARENTLY CAPTURED BAYEUX PD PARAGRAPH EARLY THIS MORNING I AM INFORMED THAT A GERMAN COUNTER ATTACK BY PARTS OF TWO PANZER DIVISIONS IS PUSHING IN ON THE RIGHT OF THE BRITISH SECTOR AND HAS MADE SOME PROGRESS PD HOWEVER CMA YESTERDAY AFTERNOON WHILE I WAS PRESENT ON THOSE BEACHES THE SEVENTH ARMORED DIVISION WAS BUSY UNLOADING AND THIS EARLY ENEMY THREAT SHOULD BE EFFECTIVELY COUNTERED PD PARAGRAPH ON THE AMERICAN BEACHES THE SECOND AND NINETIETH DIVISIONS WERE DUE TO BEGIN LANDING LAST NIGHT AND CMA WHILE I HAVE HAD NO REPORTS THIS MORNING CMA I BELIEVE THAT THE GOOD WEATHER LAST NIGHT SHOULD HAVE PERMITTED THE LANDING OF CONSIDERABLE REINFORCEMENTS IN THOSE DISTRICTS PD PARAGRAPH DUE TO THE FLUID NATURE OF THIS BATTLE IT HAS BEEN EXTREMELY DIFFICULT TO GIVE LOGICAL TARGETS TO MUCH OF OUR AIR FORCES BUT I AM CONFIDENT THAT IF WEATHER PERMITS OUR AIR WILL INTERVENE EFFECTIVELY IN ANY ATTEMPTED COUNTER ATTACKS BY THE ENEMY.

end of message

CCS, SCAF 48

SHAEF MESSAGE FORM

ACCOMPANIED BY ADMIRAL RAMSAY I MADE YESTERDAY A COMPLETE TOUR BY DESTROYER OF THE LANDING AREAS BEGINNING ON THE RIGHT PD PAREN 90024 T04SCC TO THE COMBINED CHIEFS OF STAFF FROM EISENHOWER CITE SHSAC PD THIS IS SCAF NUMBER FORTY EIGHT PD UNPAREN THE LANDINGS ON THE CONTENTIN PENINSULA APPARENTLY WENT ABOUT AS WELL AS COULD BE EXPECTED WITH THE ONE HUNDRED FIRST AIRBORNE DIVISION CARRYING OUT ITS MISSIONS IN GOOD STYLE PD INFORMATION OF THE EIGHTY SECOND AIRBORNE IS MEAGER BUT GENERAL BRADLEY INFORMED ME THAT THE SEVENTH CORPS HAD MADE CONTACT WITH IT PD ON BEACH O REPEAT OBOE ATTACK/ED BY THE FIFTH CORPS OPPOSITION WAS UNEXPECTEDLY HEAVY DUE TO THE PRESENCE ON THE BEACHES OF A FULL GERMAN DIVISION WHICH WAS ON MANEUVERS PD LOSSES HAVE BEEN CONSIDERABLE IN THIS FORCE AND LANDINGS HAVE BEEN MOST DIFFICULT DUE TO THE COVERAGE OF BEACHES BY HOSTILE ARTILLERY PD MOREOVER A LARGE PORTION OF D D TANKS FOUNDERED ON THEIR WAY TO THE BEACHES PD DUE TO THE ROUGH WEATHER DECISION WAS MADE ON THE OTHER BEACHES NOT REPEAT NOT TO ATTEMPT TO SWIM IN THE D D TANKS PD THESE WERE UNLOADED DIRECTLY ON THE BEACHES FROM THE LCT’S CARRYING THEM PD

Group #3
The diary of Lt Sidney J. Montz, US 4th Division, May 15- June 17, 1944.

May 15 Monday (21 days before June 6) Moved from Healthfield to Shiphay, Marshalling area arrived at night

May 16 – June 1 Took things easy, drew equipment, time off to Torquay, took a few short marches to keep in shape (6 mi and 4 mi). A few days before June 1st we were briefed, shown maps and sand table of where we were going. Everything in good shape. I was exec. off. but will take 81-MM in Wittenberser does not know Mortar, off in Co.
– 1st Pn Buckles
– 2nd Pt Woodruff
– 3rd Pt Wittenberger
– 1st Sec. Leyy
– 2nd Buckalew
– 3rd Olson
– Exec. Montz
– CO Samson

June 2
Left camp at 1020 for Torquay, got on LCUP to go to ship (the SS Diekman) on ship life was OK

June 3
Sat. More briefing and plans for landing

June 4
Sun. Too busy to go to church ? Marking final preparation ? Heard we sail to-day for landing to-morrow ? Weather very bad so things called off. Spent most the night in lounge, drinking coffee and listening to Radio. Heard the fall of Rome, in bed by 0200

June 5
Mon. Heard we sail at 1300, Gen Ike Message read over the loud speaker after we sailed. Told D-Day June 6 H Hour 0630. We anchor at 0200 June 6 and get in LVP. Checked all equipment that was already in LCUP. Men in good shape and ready to go. Told that 10,500 planes would be in operation, 6000 bombers, rest fighter bombers. Did not know anything except we land on Utah beach Red and Green with 12,000 paratroops landing H-4 inland. Messed around, shooting bull and kidding each other. Channel pretty rough. Men will be fed at 2200, off at 2400

June 6 – D-Day
2400- Eating a good meal, may be the last one, went down to compartment with my boat team. Sea very rough

0230- Started loading about 0230, went over side down net and it was really tough. Took off to rendezvous area, had a tough time finding it, made it OK. Started circling, finally the other boats came in. Planes lit up the beaches, AA fire starting, flares dropping, beautiful sight but it scares the hell out of you. Hit line of departure, first and 2nd. Wave practically on the beach, all hell broke loose from the beach, some boats hit by 88, they are on beach and going in. We are near beach and 88 opened up on the boat on our right and almost hit us. Some boats hit landmine, lucky we landed because much more we would have sunk, water still rough. Jumped out in waist deep water, about 500 or 600 yds from seawall, the longest I have ever seen in my life, M.G., Mortar and artillery fire around us, finally in shallow water and able to run, had to miss all times of obstacles in and out of the water. Picked up six rds. Of 81-MM ammo on the way, it seemed as though we would never reach sea wall. Men being blown up and hit all around me, you could hear them scream, it was horrible. Finally hit sea wall, stopped to get a blow and bearing. Gen Roosevelt walking around telling everyone to clear beach or they would get killed. Rockets hit the third section, insured ? Lt Levy, Arps, Singer, Cole, Sgt Hasting, Killed, Cpl Herr, Brandt, Wadja. Check with CO.
Time to move or they will kill us all. Gen Roosevelt gave me lots of courage. A Co about 500 yds to front finally got over with Wittenberger and one section, another sec. coming up under small arms and artillery fire. Navy left us 1000 yds. too far left, the left outfit caught hell. Moved in very fast, every house and tree loaded with men, they fire at you from all directions, very hard to see them as they use smokeless powder. Will get on to them soon then they will catch hell

June 10 Saturday
1400- Hit by sniper as taking A sqd. To A Co right flank, 100 yds. from road west of Montebourg. We were catching hell but know we will hold them, had 400 yds to get to objective. On way to aid station, hit in neck and right leg. Bandaged up and put in ambulance to be taken to beach, then sent to England. Spent the night in field tent, caught in air raid

June 11 Sunday Put on LCM and sent to hosp. ship, impossible to sail due to E boats in channels

June 12 Monday Sailed for England, destination Naval Hospital at South Hampton. Got in pretty late, was fed, a good bath, clean clothes, a bed with sheets. Doctors looked at us

June 13 Tuesday Rested, ate, slept. Doctor came

June 14 Wednesday Same as Tuesday, had two x-ray taken of a jaw and leg. Saw a show

June 15 Thursday Prepare to leave at 1930 for army Hosp. Board Hosp. train for 53rd Gen. Hosp near Malvern, about 200 miles from South Hampton

June 16 Friday Arrived 0700, took ambulance to hosp. Food and bed. Rest

June 17 Saturday Eat, sleep, rest. Doctor

Group #4
US newspaper articles about D-Day, June 6, 1944

War News Summarized
Tuesday, June 6, 1944

The invasion of Western Europe began this morning. Gen Eisenhower, in his first communiqué‚ from Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Force, issued at 3:30 A. M., said that Allied naval forces supported by strong air forces began landing Allied armies this morning on the northern coast of France.

The assault was made by British, American, and Canadian troops who, under command of Gen Sir Bernard L. Montgomery, landed in Normandy. London gave no further details but earlier Berlin had broadcast that parachute troops had landed on the Normandy Peninsula near Cherbourg and that invasion forces were pouring from landing craft under cover of warships near Le Havre. Dunkerque and Calais were being heavily bombed, the Germans said.

Later announcements from Berlin said that there was fighting between Caen and Trouville and that shock and that shock troops had swung into action to halt the invasion. [All the foregoing, 1:8:]

Gen Eisenhower, in an order of the day to each member of the great crusade, told his men the enemy would fight savagely and added : We will accept nothing less than full victory. Good luck. In a broadcast to the Peoples of Western Europe, he said the day would come when he would need their full help. A special word to France added that Frenchmen would rule the country. [1:6-7] Almost simultaneously it was announced that Gen de Gaulle had arrived in London. [6:2]

The liberation of Rome in no way slowed the Allied pursuit of the tired and disorganized German armies in Italy yesterday. Armored and motorized units sped across the Tiber River to press hard upon the retreating enemy’s heels. Five hundred heavy bombers joined with lighter aircraft to smash rail and road routes leading to northern Italy and to add to the foes demoralization. The Eighth Army, despite heavy opposition, especially northeast of Valmontone, captured a number of strategic towns. [1:3; map P.2]

Gen Clark said that parts of the two German armies had been smashed. He doubted the ability of the German Fourteenth to put up effective opposition and declared that the Tenth had taken a bad beating. [3:1]

King Victor Emmanuel fulfilled his promise and turned over all authority to his son, Crown Prince Humbert. [1:5-6.]

President Roosevelt warned the people of the United States in a radio talk last night not to over-emphasize the military significance of the liberation of Rome. Germany has not yet been driven to surrender, he said. Victory still lies some distance ahead. It will be tough and it will be costly. The president appealed to the world to give Italy a chance to contribute her share to a lasting peace. [1:1.]

In the Pacific theater Americans were converging on the Biak airfields. Allied planes sank one and damaged two Japanese destroyers and shot down at least eighteen aircraft. [8:1.]

FIRST ALLIED LANDING MADE ON SHORES OF WESTERN EUROPE

Gen Eisenhower’s armies invaded northern France this morning. While the landing points were not specified, the Germans said that troops had gone ashore near Le Havre and that fighting raged at Caen (1). The enemy also said that the parachutists had descended at the northern tip of the Normandy Peninsula (2) and heavy bombing had been visited on Calais and Dunkerque (3).
(Source : New York Times, June 6 1944)

Landings in West France Reported by Germans;
Not Confirmed by Allies

LONDON, June 6 (Tuesday.) Three German news agencies this morning flashed word to the world that an Allied invasion of Western France had begun with Allied parachute troops spilling out of the dawn skies over the Normandy Peninsula and seaborne forces landing in the Le Havre area. There was no immediate Allied confirmation.

The Germans also said that Allied warships were furiously bombarding the big German-held French port of Le Havre at the mouth of the Seine River, 100 miles west of Paris.

German shock troops were hurled against Allied troops rushing ashore from landing barges, the broadcasts said.

Le Havre lies 80 miles across the Channel from the British coast.

Dunkirk and Calais Reported Attacked
Dunkirk and Calais, just across the Channel coast from Britain, were under attack by strong formations of bombers, D.N.B. said.

The long-expected invasion by the British and Americans was begun in the first hours of the morning of June 6 by the landing of parachute troops in the area of the mouth of the Seine, declared the Transocean broadcast.

Allied headquarters remained silent.
The German D.N.B. agency said Le Havre was being violently bombarded at the present moment (7 a.m., German time or 10 p.m. P.W.T Monday night.) German naval forces are engaged in fighting with enemy landing craft off the coast. Calais and Dunkirk, which Berlin said were under heavy air attack, are also important French ports along the invasion coast 150 miles northeast of Le Havre.

LATE WAR BULLETINS
NEW YORK, June 6 A BBC broadcast recorded this morning by the Blue Network warned residents of France that a new phase of the air war against the Continent had begun and told them to stand by for further instructions that would be dropped by leaflet. British Warn Dutch to Leave
LONDON, June 6 (Tuesday.) (U.P.) Shortly before
Source : Los Angeles Times, June 6, 1944



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